RESEARCH ARTICLES

MEMORY AND HIERARCHICAL BEHAVIOUR IN MICE, RATS AND GUINEA PIGS
Chitra R. Nair, Joseph Mathew, K. Shyama, P. C. Saseendran, K. S. Anil and A. Kannan

 

Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences.2008. 39:49-52.

 

Open Access

 

Copyright: © 2008 Chitra R. Nair et.al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 



Abstract


A study was conducted to retrieve information on the memory and hierarchical traits in mice, rats and guinea pigs by sequential separations and re-mixing at different time intervals and recording the aggression, dominance and submissive behavioural traits. The results of the study indicated that among the three species of animals studied, guinea pig was found to be the least aggressive. Loss of hair around the mouth due to severe fighting (barbering) was found to be more with mice than rat. Cage stereotypies shown by rats were clinging on the roof of the cage, biting the meshes of the cage and eating the plastic portion of the cage. Constant pacing or circling of the cage, gnawing of the bars were the cage steriotypies shown by mice. Animals of all species established stable, sound hierarchy within 24 h. It was concluded that all the species retained varying levels of memory that lasted for less than a week as indicated by increasing trend of the duration of the aggression in each episode.


Key words:  Hierarchy, behaviour, memory